Ocorrência

Insects of the Forest-Tundra Ecotone (ForTunE)

Versão mais recente publicado por Norwegian Institute of Bioeconomy Research em 2 de Agosto de 2023 Norwegian Institute of Bioeconomy Research
Publication date:
2 de Agosto de 2023
Licença:
CC-BY 4.0

Baixe a última versão do recurso de dados, como um Darwin Core Archive (DwC-A) ou recurso de metadados, como EML ou RTF:

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Descrição

The forest–tundra ecotone, which spans the whole northern Hemisphere, is the zone where closed forests gradually give way to open arctic or alpine tundra. In northern Norway, the forest–tundra ecotone is formed by three main vegetation types: (1) subarctic forests, where the canopy layer is formed almost exclusively by mountain birch; (2) a transitional zone of tall-shrub tundra dominated by diverse willow species in various combinations; and (3) arctic and alpine tundra, with low vegetation consisting of dwarf shrubs, herbs, grasses, mosses, and lichens. During the coming decades, the distributions of the different habitat types within the forest–tundra ecotone will change dramatically as a result of the warming climate. Especially open tundra habitats will shrink from their current extent due to shrub expansion. This may lead to significant losses of vertebrate and invertebrate species in open tundra habitats, but also of species living within other components of the forest–tundra ecotone. Predicting the effects of climate change requires detailed information on current diversity as well as the habitat and niche requirements of individual species. In our project, we use DNA barcodes to identify and to infer niches of insect species in different habitats within the forest–tundra ecotone. The first part of our project concentrates on the most important groups of plant-feeding insects in the north: butterflies and moths, symphytan hymenopterans (sawflies), beetles, leaf-mining flies, and hyperdiverse gall midges. In particular, we aim to barcode larvae collected directly from identified host plants, because the host plants determine the habitat(s) in which a given insect species can survive. In our second main line of investigation, we barcode hymenopteran and dipteran parasitoids reared from the herbivore larvae. Parasitoids are known to be hyperdiverse in subarctic and arctic environments, but are extremely difficult to identify based on morphological traits. Parasitoids constitute the main source of mortality for the larvae of other insects, so understanding parasitoid species richness and community composition in the forest–tundra ecotone will, for example, help to understand the regulation of moth outbreaks in mountain birch forests. Our barcoding project provides information on insect diversity in different habitats within the northern forest–tundra ecotone, provides genetic tools and reference databases for ongoing and planned environmental monitoring efforts, and results in data that can be used to estimate the threats that specific insect species, taxa, and communities face because of the warming climate of the future.

Registros de Dados

Os dados deste recurso de ocorrência foram publicados como um Darwin Core Archive (DwC-A), que é o formato padronizado para compartilhamento de dados de biodiversidade como um conjunto de uma ou mais tabelas de dados. A tabela de dados do núcleo contém 783 registros.

This IPT archives the data and thus serves as the data repository. The data and resource metadata are available for download in the downloads section. The versions table lists other versions of the resource that have been made publicly available and allows tracking changes made to the resource over time.

Versões

A tabela abaixo mostra apenas versões de recursos que são publicamente acessíveis.

Como citar

Pesquisadores deveriam citar esta obra da seguinte maneira:

Nyman, T. 2023. Insects of the forest-tundra-ecotone (ForTunE).

Direitos

Pesquisadores devem respeitar a seguinte declaração de direitos:

O editor e o detentor dos direitos deste trabalho é Norwegian Institute of Bioeconomy Research. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution (CC-BY 4.0) License.

GBIF Registration

Este recurso foi registrado no GBIF e atribuído ao seguinte GBIF UUID: 83bf1012-38d7-4260-8d3a-866516c65c82.  Norwegian Institute of Bioeconomy Research publica este recurso, e está registrado no GBIF como um publicador de dados aprovado por GBIF Norway.

Palavras-chave

Arctic; herbivore; parasitoid; plant-herbivore-parasitoid networks; pollinators; Salix; Norway; Chalcidoidea; Ichneumonoidea; Egle; Cecidomyiidae

Contatos

Tommi Nyman
  • Originador
  • Ponto De Contato
Researcher
NIBIO
Svanhovd 35
9925 Svanvik
NO
+47 902 84 254

Cobertura Geográfica

Northern and eastern Finnmark in Norway

Coordenadas delimitadoras Sul Oeste [69,157, 28,49], Norte Leste [70,584, 30,795]

Cobertura Taxonômica

N/A

Reino Animalia
Filo Arthropoda
Class Insecta
Ordem Diptera
Família Anthomyiidae

Dados Sobre o Projeto

The forest–tundra ecotone, which spans the whole northern Hemisphere, is the zone where closed forests gradually give way to open arctic or alpine tundra. In northern Norway, the forest–tundra ecotone is formed by three main vegetation types: (1) subarctic forests, where the canopy layer is formed almost exclusively by mountain birch; (2) a transitional zone of tall-shrub tundra dominated by diverse willow species in various combinations; and (3) arctic and alpine tundra, with low vegetation consisting of dwarf shrubs, herbs, grasses, mosses, and lichens. During the coming decades, the distributions of the different habitat types within the forest–tundra ecotone will change dramatically as a result of the warming climate. Especially open tundra habitats will shrink from their current extent due to shrub expansion. This may lead to significant losses of vertebrate and invertebrate species in open tundra habitats, but also of species living within other components of the forest–tundra ecotone. Predicting the effects of climate change requires detailed information on current diversity as well as the habitat and niche requirements of individual species. In our project, we use DNA barcodes to identify and to infer niches of insect species in different habitats within the forest–tundra ecotone. The first part of our project concentrates on the most important groups of plant-feeding insects in the north: butterflies and moths, symphytan hymenopterans (sawflies), beetles, leaf-mining flies, and hyperdiverse gall midges. In particular, we aim to barcode larvae collected directly from identified host plants, because the host plants determine the habitat(s) in which a given insect species can survive. In our second main line of investigation, we barcode hymenopteran and dipteran parasitoids reared from the herbivore larvae. Parasitoids are known to be hyperdiverse in subarctic and arctic environments, but are extremely difficult to identify based on morphological traits. Parasitoids constitute the main source of mortality for the larvae of other insects, so understanding parasitoid species richness and community composition in the forest–tundra ecotone will, for example, help to understand the regulation of moth outbreaks in mountain birch forests. Our barcoding project provides information on insect diversity in different habitats within the northern forest–tundra ecotone, provides genetic tools and reference databases for ongoing and planned environmental monitoring efforts, and results in data that can be used to estimate the threats that specific insect species, taxa, and communities face because of the warming climate of the future.

Título Insects of the Forest-Tundra Ecotone
Identificador Artsprosjekt_27-19_ForTunE
Financiamento Artsdatabanken (project 27-19)
Descrição da Área de Estudo Northern and Eastern Finnmark, Norway

O pessoal envolvido no projeto:

Tommi Nyman
Erkka Laine
  • Provedor De Conteúdo
Kenneth Kuba
  • Provedor De Conteúdo
Jon Peder Lindemann
  • Provedor De Conteúdo
Janika Ahola
  • Provedor De Conteúdo
Patrycja Dominiak
  • Provedor De Conteúdo
Snorre Hagen
  • Proprietário

Métodos de Amostragem

(1) Insects reared from Salix catkins and galls (2) Insects collected from flowers of Rubus chamaemorus and Salix species (3) Material from Malaise traps (4) Observations of Salix species

Área de Estudo Insects and plants of Northern and Eastern Finnmark, Norway

Descrição dos passos do método:

  1. Collecting, rearing, sorting, identification, DNA barcoding

Dados de Coleção

Nome da Coleção NIBIO Svanhovd Biobank
Métodos de preservação do espécime Álcool

Metadados Adicionais

Identificadores alternativos 83bf1012-38d7-4260-8d3a-866516c65c82
https://ipt.gbif.no/resource?r=artsprosjekt_27-19_fortune