Occurrence

Insects of the Forest-Tundra Ecotone (ForTunE)

Dernière version Publié par Norwegian Institute of Bioeconomy Research le 2 août 2023 Norwegian Institute of Bioeconomy Research
Date de publication:
2 août 2023
Licence:
CC-BY 4.0

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Description

The forest–tundra ecotone, which spans the whole northern Hemisphere, is the zone where closed forests gradually give way to open arctic or alpine tundra. In northern Norway, the forest–tundra ecotone is formed by three main vegetation types: (1) subarctic forests, where the canopy layer is formed almost exclusively by mountain birch; (2) a transitional zone of tall-shrub tundra dominated by diverse willow species in various combinations; and (3) arctic and alpine tundra, with low vegetation consisting of dwarf shrubs, herbs, grasses, mosses, and lichens. During the coming decades, the distributions of the different habitat types within the forest–tundra ecotone will change dramatically as a result of the warming climate. Especially open tundra habitats will shrink from their current extent due to shrub expansion. This may lead to significant losses of vertebrate and invertebrate species in open tundra habitats, but also of species living within other components of the forest–tundra ecotone. Predicting the effects of climate change requires detailed information on current diversity as well as the habitat and niche requirements of individual species. In our project, we use DNA barcodes to identify and to infer niches of insect species in different habitats within the forest–tundra ecotone. The first part of our project concentrates on the most important groups of plant-feeding insects in the north: butterflies and moths, symphytan hymenopterans (sawflies), beetles, leaf-mining flies, and hyperdiverse gall midges. In particular, we aim to barcode larvae collected directly from identified host plants, because the host plants determine the habitat(s) in which a given insect species can survive. In our second main line of investigation, we barcode hymenopteran and dipteran parasitoids reared from the herbivore larvae. Parasitoids are known to be hyperdiverse in subarctic and arctic environments, but are extremely difficult to identify based on morphological traits. Parasitoids constitute the main source of mortality for the larvae of other insects, so understanding parasitoid species richness and community composition in the forest–tundra ecotone will, for example, help to understand the regulation of moth outbreaks in mountain birch forests. Our barcoding project provides information on insect diversity in different habitats within the northern forest–tundra ecotone, provides genetic tools and reference databases for ongoing and planned environmental monitoring efforts, and results in data that can be used to estimate the threats that specific insect species, taxa, and communities face because of the warming climate of the future.

Enregistrements de données

Les données de cette ressource occurrence ont été publiées sous forme d'une Archive Darwin Core (Darwin Core Archive ou DwC-A), le format standard pour partager des données de biodiversité en tant qu'ensemble d'un ou plusieurs tableurs de données. Le tableur de données du cœur de standard (core) contient 783 enregistrements.

Cet IPT archive les données et sert donc de dépôt de données. Les données et métadonnées de la ressource sont disponibles pour téléchargement dans la section téléchargements. Le tableau des versions liste les autres versions de chaque ressource rendues disponibles de façon publique et permet de tracer les modifications apportées à la ressource au fil du temps.

Versions

Le tableau ci-dessous n'affiche que les versions publiées de la ressource accessibles publiquement.

Comment citer

Les chercheurs doivent citer cette ressource comme suit:

Nyman, T. 2023. Insects of the forest-tundra-ecotone (ForTunE).

Droits

Les chercheurs doivent respecter la déclaration de droits suivante:

L’éditeur et détenteur des droits de cette ressource est Norwegian Institute of Bioeconomy Research. Ce travail est sous licence Creative Commons Attribution (CC-BY) 4.0.

Enregistrement GBIF

Cette ressource a été enregistrée sur le portail GBIF, et possède l'UUID GBIF suivante : 83bf1012-38d7-4260-8d3a-866516c65c82.  Norwegian Institute of Bioeconomy Research publie cette ressource, et est enregistré dans le GBIF comme éditeur de données avec l'approbation du GBIF Norway.

Mots-clé

Arctic; herbivore; parasitoid; plant-herbivore-parasitoid networks; pollinators; Salix; Norway; Chalcidoidea; Ichneumonoidea; Egle; Cecidomyiidae

Contacts

Tommi Nyman
  • Créateur
  • Personne De Contact
Researcher
NIBIO
Svanhovd 35
9925 Svanvik
NO
+47 902 84 254

Couverture géographique

Northern and eastern Finnmark in Norway

Enveloppe géographique Sud Ouest [69,157, 28,49], Nord Est [70,584, 30,795]

Couverture taxonomique

N/A

Kingdom Animalia
Phylum Arthropoda
Class Insecta
Order Diptera
Family Anthomyiidae

Données sur le projet

The forest–tundra ecotone, which spans the whole northern Hemisphere, is the zone where closed forests gradually give way to open arctic or alpine tundra. In northern Norway, the forest–tundra ecotone is formed by three main vegetation types: (1) subarctic forests, where the canopy layer is formed almost exclusively by mountain birch; (2) a transitional zone of tall-shrub tundra dominated by diverse willow species in various combinations; and (3) arctic and alpine tundra, with low vegetation consisting of dwarf shrubs, herbs, grasses, mosses, and lichens. During the coming decades, the distributions of the different habitat types within the forest–tundra ecotone will change dramatically as a result of the warming climate. Especially open tundra habitats will shrink from their current extent due to shrub expansion. This may lead to significant losses of vertebrate and invertebrate species in open tundra habitats, but also of species living within other components of the forest–tundra ecotone. Predicting the effects of climate change requires detailed information on current diversity as well as the habitat and niche requirements of individual species. In our project, we use DNA barcodes to identify and to infer niches of insect species in different habitats within the forest–tundra ecotone. The first part of our project concentrates on the most important groups of plant-feeding insects in the north: butterflies and moths, symphytan hymenopterans (sawflies), beetles, leaf-mining flies, and hyperdiverse gall midges. In particular, we aim to barcode larvae collected directly from identified host plants, because the host plants determine the habitat(s) in which a given insect species can survive. In our second main line of investigation, we barcode hymenopteran and dipteran parasitoids reared from the herbivore larvae. Parasitoids are known to be hyperdiverse in subarctic and arctic environments, but are extremely difficult to identify based on morphological traits. Parasitoids constitute the main source of mortality for the larvae of other insects, so understanding parasitoid species richness and community composition in the forest–tundra ecotone will, for example, help to understand the regulation of moth outbreaks in mountain birch forests. Our barcoding project provides information on insect diversity in different habitats within the northern forest–tundra ecotone, provides genetic tools and reference databases for ongoing and planned environmental monitoring efforts, and results in data that can be used to estimate the threats that specific insect species, taxa, and communities face because of the warming climate of the future.

Titre Insects of the Forest-Tundra Ecotone
Identifiant Artsprosjekt_27-19_ForTunE
Financement Artsdatabanken (project 27-19)
Description du domaine d'étude / de recherche Northern and Eastern Finnmark, Norway

Les personnes impliquées dans le projet:

Tommi Nyman
Erkka Laine
  • Fournisseur De Contenu
Kenneth Kuba
  • Fournisseur De Contenu
Jon Peder Lindemann
  • Fournisseur De Contenu
Janika Ahola
  • Fournisseur De Contenu
Patrycja Dominiak
  • Fournisseur De Contenu
Snorre Hagen
  • Propriétaire

Méthodes d'échantillonnage

(1) Insects reared from Salix catkins and galls (2) Insects collected from flowers of Rubus chamaemorus and Salix species (3) Material from Malaise traps (4) Observations of Salix species

Etendue de l'étude Insects and plants of Northern and Eastern Finnmark, Norway

Description des étapes de la méthode:

  1. Collecting, rearing, sorting, identification, DNA barcoding

Données de collection

Nom de la collection NIBIO Svanhovd Biobank
Méthode de conservation des spécimens Alcohol

Métadonnées additionnelles

Identifiants alternatifs 83bf1012-38d7-4260-8d3a-866516c65c82
https://ipt.gbif.no/resource?r=artsprosjekt_27-19_fortune